AIAA revers its Restrictions against Iranian Members

To: Hojabri

The Board has suspended implementation of the embargoed nations policy that they approved on 11 May. They will formally reconsider the policy at their 1 September meeting.

Consequently, we have reinstated all of the manuscripts that were
withdrawn in May and have notified the authors accordingly. The Iranian
reviewers also have been reinstated.

AIAA editorial staff will make every effort to expedite the handling of
the reinstated papers. Please do the same on your end, giving them some priority because of the month-long delay to which they’ve been subjected.

Thanks,
Norma

—————————————————-

Th Dear Board of Directors, 

The motion below, receiving 20 Yea votes, has passed: 

 “Due to the concerns by many AIAA members, it is proposed that the 
 recently approved AIAA Embargoed Nations Policy be suspended until the 
 Sept. 1 BOD meeting. Between now and the Sept. 1 meeting, relevant 
 information will be distributed to the members of the AIAA BOD. At the 
 Sept. 1 BOD meeting, the AIAA Embargoed Nations Policy will be 
 reconsidered with possible modifications, if necessary and/or 
 appropriate”. 

 Thank you, 

 Dave Quackenbush 
 Treasurer and Secretary 

————————————————————–

Another US Organization bans publication by Iranian Authors

Dear university friends:

One year after our successful fight to reverse OFAC’s ruling on publication by authors fromIran, another US professional organization decided to impose similar bans on publication and to prevent participation of Iranian authors to their conferences.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) in its May meeting passed a resolution imposing these restrictions based on the old OFAC’s ruling and the sanction Law against Embargoed countries.

Following this decision, papers that were already accepted for publication were rejected and presentations of the Iranian authors were removed from the Conference program on Fluid Dynamics inToronto. After colleagues from SUT informed us about this policy SUTA sent a letter to the President of AIAA and asked for restoring the presentations to the program of AIAA conference.

Today,June 2, 2005, AIAA informed us that they will allow the Iranian authors to present their papers at the conference, but they have refused to cancel their resolution.

While SUTA is pleased with this partial victory, but we will continue our involvement and publicize this issue until AIAA has changed its policy. You may also contact AIAA and express your opinion:

Regards,

Fredun Hojabri

———————————————————————-

Thu, 2 Jun 2005

aiaa.org

Dear Bob:

I am pleased that at least for now the problem is solved and all participants can attend the conference and deliver their papers.

We are quite confident that the Board of AIAA will finally change the Resolution passed in its May meeting:

“During its May meeting, the AIAA Board of Directors clarified the Institute’s implementation of the United States policy on embargoed nations.                                              

                                                                                                
 The Board resolved that AIAA, consistent with U.S. laws and policies, shall not knowingly provide products or services to, or engage in formal, technical information exchange with      
 individuals or entities residing in embargoed nations. This restriction applies to staff as well as to members when they are acting on behalf of AIAA, and applies to all AIAA products and services.                                                                                  
The nations currently embargoed are: Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan. The Board will consider amendments to this policy as U.S. Government policies change.”

This Resolution is contrary to the OFAC’s ruling and the Embargo Law; see the attached letter of Congressman Borman, who introduced the Embargo Law, to OFAC and the consequent revised ruling of OFAC.

AIAA is a professional and scientific organization and not a security agency.

If materials presented to the open Fluid Dynamics conference can be used ‘to design rockets to deliver atomic bombs,’ then Iranians should be barred from studying chemistry or physics in the USA!

Regards,

Fredun Hojabri

——————————————————————————-

 Thu,2 Jun 2005

 Fredun,

 While the policy isn’t being changed, there will be an exception granted forToronto. Specifically, anyone that arrives in Toronto for the conference will be allowed to participate.

 Bob Dickman, Exec. Dir

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

——————————————————————————————————–

From: Kimberly Grant

Subject: AIAA Paper – Tracking Number 37824
Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 14:17:34 -0400

Dear Author:

We have decided to grant a waiver to our Embargoed Nations Policy for the
upcoming 17th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference.  While the
policy isn¹t being changed, there will be an exception granted for this meeting. 

Specifically, anyone that arrives in Toronto for the conference will be allowed to participate

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Kimberly Grant
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

————————————————————————

http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2005/623/1

 Science Magazine   

23 June 2005

AIAA Suspends Ban on Embargoed Nations

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) has temporarily suspended its ban on papers from countries under a U.S. trade embargo. The institute will make a final decision about the policy after its next board meeting on 1 September.

AIAA instituted the ban last month after its board of directors resolved that publishing papers submitted to AIAA journals or AIAA-sponsored conferences by authors from Iran, Cuba, North Korea, and Sudan would be inconsistent with the U.S. government's embargo policies against those countries (Science NOW, 15 June). Other scientific societies were surprised by the decision because it seems to fly in the face of a December 2004 ruling by the U.S. government that journals were free to edit and publish submissions from embargoed nations.

The suspension of the ban, announced yesterday on AIAA’s Web site, means that the institute’s journals will resume publishing papers from anywhere. The two dozen Iranian-authored manuscripts that were pulled by AIAA will be reinstated. The reprieve follows a vote by the board to review the ban in light of concerns expressed by many AIAA members.

The Sharif University of Technology Association (SUTA), an Iranian organization that campaigned against the ban, welcomed the announcement but expressed disappointment that the board had not revoked the ban permanently. “We think this is probably a face saving strategy, not to accept that they made a mistake,” SUTA’ former President Fredun Hojabri told Science in an e-mail.

AIAA Board member David Jensen, a civil engineer at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, says his colleagues wanted more time to ponder how best to align the 30,000-member organization’s

Publications policy with the security interests of the United States. "I believe providing technical feedback to authors in embargoed countries is a violation of the U.S. government's policies," he says. "The ideal solution is for these countries to stop threatening the United States and other free countries, so that we can go back to an open exchange."

Masoud Darbandi, an aerospace engineer at Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, whose paper on high-temperature irradiance was re-accepted by the Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer after the ban was suspended, sees the issue differently. The society should not “mix political issues with academic affairs,” he says. “Iranian researchers want to contribute to knowledge just as researchers anywhere else.”

–YUDHIJIT BHATTACHARJEE

—————————————————————————————-

Chronicle of Higher Education

June 17, 2005-06-20

Publisher Won’t Run Papers by Authors in Countries Subject to U.S.Trade Embargo

By RICHARD MONASTERSKY

POLITICAL HEAT: Physicists can predict the fate of the universe and the path of subatomic particles, but they have no equations to calculate the effects of politics. Masoud Darbandi learned that lesson last month, when his paper on heat and air currents was banned from The Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer.

The problem wasn’t with the quality of the manuscript, titled “Numerical Simulation of Thermobuoyant Flow With a Large Temperature Variation.” The journal had sent the paper out for review and had accepted it. But in May, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, which publishes the journal, decided to stop running papers by authors inIran and other countries that are subject to aU.S. trade embargo. It is Mr. Darbandi’s misfortune that he is an associate professor of aerospace engineering at Sharif University of Technology, inTehran.

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics calls itself the main professional society for aerospace engineers and scientists. Its new policy stands in sharp contrast with the actions of other American academic organizations, many of which led a successful battle over the past two years to reverse a decision by the U.S. Treasury Department to curtail academic transactions with countries subject to the embargo.

Scientists from countries subject to the embargo will also be banned from the institute’s conferences, according to the new policy, which was adopted by the institute’s Board of Directors in May. The institute, known as the AIAA, notified authors about it later that month.

The directors resolved that the “AIAA, consistent with U.S. laws and policies, shall not knowingly provide products or services to, or engage in formal, technical information exchange with, individuals or entities residing in embargoed nations,” a statement on the organization’s Web site says. “This restriction applies to staff as well as to members when they are acting on behalf of AIAA, and applies to all AIAA products and services.”

In addition to Iran, the new policy applies to Cuba, North Korea, and Sudan. The institute has about 30,000 members, some 5,000 of them overseas. The only members in embargoed countries are in Iran, said Robert S. Dickman, the institute’s executive director.

About 100 manuscripts, some of which had been peer reviewed and accepted, were pulled out of the publication process at the institute’s eight journals following the board’s decision, Mr. Dickman said. Iranian members were notified that they could not attend the institute’s meeting inTorontolast week. But after receiving complaints that the members had already bought airplane tickets and booked hotel rooms, the institute waived the ban temporarily for that meeting.

The board’s decision drew protests from Iranian scientists, including Fredun Hojabri, director of international relations for the Sharif University of Technology Association, which fosters communication among alumni and current and former professors of the university. “There is no such law that would allow them to ban the publication from these countries,” said Mr. Hojabri.

***

The new controversy follows a decision by the U.S. Treasury Department to clarify its rules about scientific exchanges with authors in embargoed countries. The department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control ruled last December that scientific exchanges with such authors were permitted. The ruling reversed a 2003 decision that had placed restrictions on such communications with those authors. The original decision was criticized by many academic organizations in theUnited States, several of which sued the Treasury Department.

In announcing the change in policy last December in a news release, Robert W. Werner, the office’s director, observed that the new ruling from his agency “provides clarity and promotes important policies aimed at the free exchange of ideas without undermining the national-security objectives of these country sanctions.”

So why has the AIAA flown into the face of the changing winds regarding academic exchange? Mr. Dickman said the aerospace institute’s Board of Directors had decided to ban exchanges because its conferences and publications often deal with applied engineering, “with the specific intention of improving the accuracy of a missile-delivery system, of the ability of an airplane to operate the delivery system for a weapon that something likeNorth Koreacould possess.”

But Mr. Darbandi said in an e-mail message that “my paper was a general purpose paper dedicated to heat-transfer research. There are no military purposes in my paper.” In fact, he says, it presents a methodology, not new technology.


http://chronicle.com
Section: Research & Publishing
Volume 51, Issue 41, Page A11

_________________________________________________________________

http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2005/623/1 

Science Magazine    

23 June 2005 

AIAA Suspends Ban on Embargoed Nations 

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) has temporarily suspended its ban on papers from countries under a U.S. trade embargo. The institute will make a final decision about the policy after its next board meeting on 1 September.

AIAA instituted the ban last month after its board of directors resolved that publishing papers submitted to AIAA journals or AIAA-sponsored conferences by authors from Iran, Cuba, North Korea, and Sudan would be inconsistent with the U.S. government's embargo policies against those countries (Science NOW, 15 June). Other scientific societies were surprised by the decision because it seems to fly in the face of a December 2004 ruling by the U.S. government that journals were free to edit and publish submissions from embargoed nations. 

The suspension of the ban, announced yesterday on AIAA's Web site, means that the institute's journals will resume publishing papers from anywhere. The two dozen Iranian-authored manuscripts that were pulled by AIAA will be reinstated. The reprieve follows a vote by the board to review the ban in light of concerns expressed by many AIAA members. 

The Sharif University of Technology Association (SUTA), an Iranian organization that campaigned against the ban, welcomed the announcement but expressed disappointment that the board had not revoked the ban permanently. "We think this is probably a face saving strategy, not to accept that they made a mistake," SUTA’ former President Fredun Hojabri told Science in an e-mail. 

AIAA Board member David Jensen, a civil engineer at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, says his colleagues wanted more time to ponder how best to align the 30,000-member organization's

Publications policy with the security interests of the United States. "I believe providing technical feedback to authors in embargoed countries is a violation of the U.S. government's policies," he says. "The ideal solution is for these countries to stop threatening the United States and other free countries, so that we can go back to an open exchange." 

Masoud Darbandi, an aerospace engineer at Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, whose paper on high-temperature irradiance was re-accepted by the Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer after the ban was suspended, sees the issue differently. The society should not "mix political issues with academic affairs," he says. "Iranian researchers want to contribute to knowledge just as researchers anywhere else."

 

--YUDHIJIT BHATTACHARJEE

__________________________________________________________

Another US Organization bans publication by Iranian Authors

Dear university friends:

One year after our successful fight to reverse OFAC’s ruling on publication by authors fromIran, anotherUSprofessional organization decided to impose similar bans on publication and to prevent participation of Iranian authors to their conferences.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) in its May meeting passed a resolution imposing these restrictions based on the old OFAC’s ruling and the sanction Law against Embargoed countries.

Following this decision, papers that were already accepted for publication were rejected and presentations of the Iranian authors were removed from the Conference program on Fluid Dynamics inToronto. After colleagues from SUT informed us about this policy SUTA sent a letter to the President of AIAA and asked for restoring the presentations to the program of AIAA conference.

Today,June 2, 2005, AIAA informed us that they will allow the Iranian authors to present their papers at the conference, but they have refused to cancel their resolution.

While SUTA is pleased with this partial victory, but we will continue our involvement and publicize this issue until AIAA has changed its policy. You may also contact AIAA and express your opinion:

President:    Prof Roger L Simpson
703/264-7511
tammys@aiaa.org

Mr Robert S Dickman
AIAA Executive Director
703/866-0784
bobd@aiaa.org

Regards,

Fredun Hojabri

Board of SUTA

Thu, 2 Jun 2005

bobd@aiaa.org

Dear Bob:

I am pleased that at least for now the problem is solved and all participants can attend the conference and deliver their papers.

SUTA is quite confident that the Board of AIAA will finally change the Resolution passed in its May meeting: 

“During its May meeting, the AIAA Board of Directors clarified the Institute’s implementation of the United States policy on embargoed nations.                                              
                                                                                                
 The Board resolved that AIAA, consistent with U.S. laws and policies, shall not knowingly provide products or services to, or engage in formal, technical information exchange with      

 individuals or entities residing in embargoed nations. This restriction applies to staff as well as to members when they are acting on behalf of AIAA, and applies to all AIAA products and services.                                                                                  
The nations currently embargoed are: Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan. The Board will consider amendments to this policy as U.S. Government policies change.”

This Resolution is contrary to the OFAC’s ruling and the Embargo Law; see the attached letter of Congressman Borman, who introduced the Embargo Law, to OFAC and the consequent revised ruling of OFAC. 

AIAA is a professional and scientific organization and not a security agency.

If materials presented to the open Fluid Dynamics conference can be used ‘to design rockets to deliver atomic bombs,’ then Iranians should be barred from studying chemistry or physics in the USA!

Regards,

Fredun Hojabri

Board of SUTA

——————-

Thu,2 Jun 2005

Fredun

While the policy isn’t being changed, there will be an exception granted forToronto. Specifically, anyone that arrives inTorontofor the conference will be allowed to participate.

Bob Dickman

Exec. Dir.

AmericanInstituteofAeronauticsand Astronautics

Date: Wed, 25 May 2005 16:18:38 -0400 (EDT)
From: embargo@writetrack.net
To: darbandi@sharif.edu
Subject: Submission Withdrawn By Editor

On 11 May 2005, the AIAA Board of Directors clarified our implementation  of the United States policy on embargoed nations.

As a result of that decision, AIAA cannot process or publish any paper from an embargoed nation (Cuba, Iran, North Korea, or Sudan). This applies to authors and co-authors. Consequently, we are withdrawing your manuscript (tracking no. 15804) from consideration. You are therefore free to submit your paper elsewhere if you choose to do so.

We apologize for this inconvenience.Sincerely,
Bob Dickman
AIAA Executive Director

From: Kimberly Grant <kimg@aiaa.org>
To: <ajahan@aut.ac.ir>
Subject: AIAA Paper – Tracking Number 37824
Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 14:17:34 -0400

Dear Author:

We have decided to grant a waiver to our Embargoed Nations Policy for the
upcoming 17th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference.  While the
policy isn¹t being changed, there will be an exception granted for this meeting.

Specifically, anyone that arrives in Toronto for the conference will be allowed to participate 

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Kimberly Grant
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics